Skill development in kids

SKILL DEVELOPMENT IN KIDS
 

While it's true that children learn more in their first three years than ever again, it's between ages three and five that they acquire the skills necessary for school. As children's attention span, memory and language skills develop, they also become increasingly more sophisticated and social—qualities they'll need for their further development in early primary Years. Although the development of various skills in each child also depends on her individual personality and temperament—a combination of mental, physical and emotional traits, even so, our developmental parameters make our guideline while designing the curriculum for JMIS-UPVAN and it can help parents as well to help their child become  ready for her/his big step.

Developmental Milestones for ANKURS (NURSERY KIDS/ 3-4 YEAR OLDS)

Children develop in specific ways but at their own pace. Some of your young preschoolers may still be developing their older toddler skills or already be developing their Pre-K skills!

The list below, although not exhaustive, shows the key abilities and processes that can be reasonably expected from a 3-4 year old in seven developmental areas.

Social Development

  • Enjoys singing and doing finger plays with others.
  • Greets familiar people.
  • Engages in simple group games.
  • Helps with clean-up activities.
  • Takes turns.
  • Gives attention to stories for 10 minutes.
  • Plays interactive games.
  • Plays with peers with minimal conflict.
  • Interacts with peers in socially appropriate manner most of the time.
  • Interacts with adults in a cooperative, socially appropriate manner most of the time.
  • Asks permission to use items belonging to others with minimal reminders.
  • Initiates and maintains independent play (for example, plays alone in the sandbox, or role-plays independently)
  • Enjoys doing things on their own sometimes, such as reading, crafts or getting dressed
  • Can separate from parents for several hours, such as an afternoon at a friend’s house or a sleepover at Grandma’s
  • Appears interested in going to a “big-kid” school, learning new things, and/or meeting new friends
  • Enjoys participating in group activities
  • Can express emotions, needs and requests
  • Responds well to consistent routines, such as quiet time or naptime following lunch
  • Anticipates what comes next during the day (for example, knows that naptime follows lunch

Cognitive Development

  • Draws faces.
  • Makes random marks on paper.
  • Makes controlled scribbles on paper.
  • Makes basic shapes.
  • Combines circles and/or squares with crossed lines.
  • Makes suns, animals, trees, flowers.(simple drawing)
  • Can sort by two different colors.
  • Understands basic prepositions (in, from, about, with, etc.)
  • Recalls familiar objects.
  • Counts up to 50 by rote.
  • Classifies objects by categories.
  • Can match identical pictures.
  • Can select the different object from combination of 2 alike and 1 different.
  • Count objects.
  • Can match 2 colors.
  • Knows own gender.

 

Emotional Development

  • Able to recover from anger or temper tantrum and be cooperative.
  • Separates from parent without reluctance.
  • Verbalizes emotions he or she is feeling.
  • Expresses displeasure with words rather than physical aggression.
  • Maintains an appropriate, stable temperament most of the time.
  • Beginning to differentiate between fact and fantasy.
  • Recognizes emotions in others.

Physical Development: Large/Gross Motor Skills

  • Increases proficiency in gross motor skills, strength and balance, such as jumping in place, standing on one foot, running and kicking
  • Jumps over obstacles when running.
  • Jumps down from object 6" to 8" off the ground.
  • Catches a 6 to 8 inch ball using arms.
  • Balances on one foot for 4-5 seconds.
  • Hops on one foot at least 2 times.
  • Walks up and down stairs unassisted, alternating feet.
  • Throws a ball over-handed and under-handed.

Physical Development: Small/Fine Motor Skills

  • Draws or copies vertical and horizontal lines.
  • Draw or copies a complete circle.
  • Builds with blocks and other building toys.
  • Strings 1" beads.
  • Cuts paper into two pieces with scissors.
  • Draws or copies two lines that cross.
  • Puts together 9-piece (or larger) puzzles.

Communication skill Development

  • Gives own first and last name and age.
  • When given a choice, names preferred object or activity.
  • Begins asking purposeful questions.
  • Uses complete sentences consistently.
  • Tells of a simple experience.
  • Sings a simple song.
  • Asks a variety of questions using "who", "what", "where", etc.
  • Tells a story using pictures.

Language skill development

  • Uses language to communicate with others for a variety of purposes (for example, describing something, making requests, greeting someone, etc.)
  • Speaks clearly to be understood by others
  • Uses accepted language and communication styles (for example, using polite manners, using appropriate volume and tone)
  • Tells simple stories
  • Uses accepted naming words, action words and describing words in familiar contexts
  • Understands words for common categories (for example, toys, food, clothes)
  • Uses sentences with two phrases or concepts

Reading skills

  • Holds a book properly and turns pages
  • Understands that words convey the message in a story
  • Recognizes the first letter of their own name
  • Knows some letter names
  • Knows the main characters in familiar stories
  • Enjoys reading books with others 

Writing skills

  • Begins to improve pencil control by using fingers rather than the whole fist to grasp pencil and stylus
  • Begins to show left/right-handedness
  • Draws with a variety of tools (crayons, pens, pencils)
  • Scribble-writes in a linear fashion

Pre-Math & Number concept skills

  • Identifies some shapes such as circle, square and triangle
  • Understands and explores empty containers and full containers
  • Recognizes and matches small quantities to the number
  • Shows interest in numbers and recites the number counts
  • Can count along with help, although might make mistakes
  • Distinguishes between "some" and "all," , “near” and “far”,” less” and” more”  etc
  • Uses some size words, such as "many"
  • Uses words such as "same as" to make comparisons
  • Shows interests in patterns and sequences
  • Classifies or sorts objects into simple groups (such as by colors and size)
  • Understands the order of the day, and begins to use some time words such as "morning" and "night"

Environmental study skills

  • Asks questions about objects, events and animals observed in their environment
  • Considers and offers explanations of how things might work
  • Shows interest in different animals and the sounds they make
  • Uses descriptive terms such as "fast" and "slow," "hot" and "cold" 
  • Recognizes common features of the home and neighborhood, such as trees, houses and streets
  • Shows interests in familiar people such as siblings, family members and friends
  • Shows interests in common jobs and professions such as firefighter, doctor and nurse

Creative skill development (art, music and drama)

  • Begins to use a variety of art tools such as crayon, construction paper and colored pencils
  • Knows the color words
  • Likes to imitate sounds and rhythm; might have a favorite song
  • Uses realistic toys in pretend play or to imitate household routines
  • Engages in dramatic play with others to act out simple play scripts, such as playing house
  • Assigns roles or takes assigned roles in pretend play.
  • Takes on characteristics and actions of role play.
  • Uses particular props during pretend play.
  • Can pretend using imaginary objects.
  • Uses language for creating and sustaining plots.
  • Uses elaborate themes, ideas, details

 

(As with all milestones, remember that there can be a 6 to 8 month window with typical development. This means that children may exhibit skills 6 to 8 months before or after the age the skills are listed above).

Developmental Milestones for PALLAVS (KG KIDS/4-5 YEAR OLDS)

Children develop in specific ways but at their own pace. Some of your young preschoolers may still be developing their younger preschool or already be developing their Kindergarten skills!

The list below, although not exhaustive, shows the key abilities and processes that can be reasonably expect from a 4-5 year old in seven developmental areas.

Social Development

  • Asks for help when needed.
  • Engages in cooperative play with small groups of children frequently.
  • Gives attention to stories for 10-15 minutes.
  • Says "please" and "thank you" without reminders.
  • Joins in mealtime conversations.
  • Initiates friendships with peers.
  • Plays interactive games.
  • Plays with peers with minimal conflict.
  • Interacts with adults and peers in a cooperative, socially appropriate manner.
  • Asks permission to use items belonging to others.

 

  • Adjusts to new situations
  • Attempts new tasks knowing it’s okay to make mistakes
  • Shows pride in accomplishments
  • Follows a simple direction
  • Stays with an activity to completion
  • Respects the rights, property and feelings of others
  • Works cooperatively (listens to others, shares and takes turns)
  • Demonstrates increasing self-control
  • Participates in clean-up activities
  • Takes responsibility for own belongings (lunch, coat, etc.)
  • Is able to dress self
  • Adheres to a routine and schedule for personal hygiene, eating meals and going to bed
  • Uses good hygiene habits and table manners
  • Uses appropriate bathroom skills
  • Follows simple safety rules
  • Offers to help peers and family
  • Tries to regulate emotions properly and articulates feelings in words

 

Cognitive Development

  • Makes suns, animals, trees, flowers and many other simple objects.
  • Counts to 100 by rote.
  • Names picture that has been hidden.
  • Comprehends concept of opposites.
  • Works a 12-piece (or larger) puzzle.
  • Draws a two-part (or 3-part) person.
  • Counts objects.
  • Identifies colors when named.
  • Identifies shapes.
  • Extends sentences logically.
  • Matches or groups objects according to size, shape or color
  • Groups objects that are the same
  • Understands concepts of in/out, under/over, on/off, front/back, etc.
  • Shows an understanding of the passing of time, including concepts of before and after, and today, yesterday and tomorrow
  • Experiments enthusiastically with new games and toys, sometimes in a trial-and-error manner
  • Describes how objects are the same or different

 

Emotional Development

  • Developing sense of humor.
  • Shows increasing levels of positive interactions and friendliness in small-group settings.
  • Responds to a specific need/desire when expressed by another child.
  • Verbalizes and is comfortable expressing a wider variety of emotions.
  • Openly and warmly expresses affection to other children.
  • Comforts other children.
  • Is able to return to equilibrium after experiencing stress.
  • Exhibits concern for fairness in what happens to others by sharing and/or taking turns.

Physical Development: Large/Gross Motor Skills

  • Balances on one foot for 5-10 seconds.
  • Jumps over a stationary rope held 6" above the ground.
  • Pedals a tricycle around obstacles and sharp corners.
  • Catches a ball in hands, arms flexed.
  • Hops around on one foot without support.
  • Walks backward.
  • Throws a ball with accuracy.

Physical Development: Small/Fine Motor Skills

  • Holds paper in place with one hand while writing with the other.
  • Cuts with scissors along a thick, straight line.
  • Draws recognizable pictures.
  • Draws or copies shapes.
  • Laces shoes or lacing board.
  • Cuts with scissors following a simple outline.

Communication skill Development

  • Follows 3-step directions without distraction.
  • Demonstrates understanding of difference between "is" and "is not" by pointing to objects.
  • Uses possessive forms of nouns (my, your, his, her etc).
  • Uses a series of conjunctions.
  • Averages at least five-word sentences in conversations.
  • Describes items and/or objects in books.
  • Speech is clear and can be understood by others.

Self-help skill development

  • Puts puzzles together
  • Cuts with scissors
  • Holds and uses crayons, markers, pens and pencils correctly
  • Builds using blocks
  • Tries to tie own shoes
  • Bounces, kicks, throws and catches a ball
  • Rides a tricycle
  • Enjoys outdoor activities, like running, jumping and climbing

Language skill development

  • Talks in sentences 
  • Follows one- and two-step oral directions
  • Uses sentences that include two or more ideas
  • Uses descriptive language
  • Knows by heart and recites some common nursery rhymes and songs
  • Pretends, creates and makes up songs or stories
  • Tells or retells stories and/or everyday experiences
  • Asks questions and expresses curiosity
  • Expresses ideas so that others can understand

Reading skills

  • Looks at books or pictures on their own
  • Pretends to read books by reading the pictures
  • Tries to read in everyday situations (signs, labels, etc.) 
  • Recognizes rhyming words
  • Blends sounds into words
  • Recognizes some common words in print
  • Recognizes many uppercase and lowercase letters
  • Recognizes some letter sounds
  • Describes characters’ actions and feelings in a story
  • Relates stories to personal experiences
  • Puts events of a story in order

Writing skills

  • Writes and draws appropriately with control.
  • Writes 2-3 letter words.
  • Attempts to write own name and recognizes own name in print

Pre-Math & Number concept skill

  • Compares the size of groups of objects using language such as “more,” “less” and “same as”
  • Arranges objects in size order (big to small, or small to big)
  • Uses comparison words, like "bigger," "smaller," "heavier," etc.
  • Understands concepts of none, some and all and more than and less than
  • Identifies and draws a square, circle and triangle.
  • Correctly counts the objects
  • Knows that the final number counted represents the total number of objects in a set
  • Recognizes the numbers
  • Can distinguish numbers from letters, and understands that numbers relate to quantity
  • Understands the effects of addition and subtraction

Environmental study skills

  • Asks questions about objects, events and animals observed in their environment
  • Considers and offers explanations of how things might work
  • Shows interest in different animals and the sounds they make
  • Uses descriptive terms such as "fast" and "slow," "hot" and "cold" 
  • Recognizes common features of the home and neighborhood, such as trees, houses and streets
  • Shows interests in familiar people such as siblings, family members and friends
  • Shows interests in common jobs and professions such as firefighter, doctor and nurse

 

Creative skill Development (art, music and drama)

  • Recognizes and names basic colors
  • Draws recognizable shapes and simple objects
  • Tells a story with pictures
  • Moves to a beat
  • Drawings have basic resemblance to objects and people
  • Articulates what he/she is drawing

 

  • Explores with common musical instruments
  • Enjoys improvising or copying musical patterns
  • Exhibits drama and movement skills
  • Assigns roles or takes assigned roles during play.
  • Takes on characteristics and actions during role play.
  • Uses language to create and sustain plots during play.
  • Uses elaborate themes, ideas, details during play.

 

(As with all milestones, remember that there can be a 6 to 8 month window with typical development. This means that children may exhibit skills 6 to 8 months before or after the age the skills listed above.)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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